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Consumer Reports: Seven car problems that can leave you stranded and how to prevent themConsumer Reports: Seven car problems that can leave you stranded and how to prevent themConsumer Reports: Seven car problems that can leave you stranded and how to pre

by:ShenHao     2020-06-14
(May 13, 2010)
When it comes to our car, most of us don\'t like surprises, especially the kind of car that keeps us stuck on the highway in bad weather.
In the magazine\'s annual car magazine, the editor of the consumer report gave advice on how to avoid unwelcome accidents such as blowout, battery dead Power, Fuse and drive belt break if they did, suggesting how to deal with them.
The full story, called the unwelcome surprise, is available online on the consumer report annual car release and consumer report, which went to market on March 2. org.
Daily Update of Consumer Reports. org is the go-
Get the latest car reviews, product news, breaking news blogs and car purchase information. 1.
Battery is dead: this is often the culprit when the engine cannot be flipped or started.
All batteries will weaken over time.
Certain activities can cause low battery power, such as not being used frequently, traveling for short distances, or using multiple accessories when the headlights are on.
Even if you forget to turn off the lights or listen to the radio when the engine is off, it will drain the power in the battery, making the battery too weak to start when you need it.
How to prevent.
While the effects of depleted batteries often appear in cold mornings, the heat that usually damages the most is summer heat.
Therefore, the battery may fail at any time.
As part of the annual inspection, be sure to test the battery and the AC generator. 2.
Puncture or puncture: puncture and puncture may be caused by road hazards, tire defects or lack of care, which will cause you to lose control of the vehicle.
If you have experienced both, the consumer report recommends firmly grasping the wheel and gently guiding the car on the road as soon as possible.
How to prevent.
Due to low tire pressure, many tire problems are caused by overheating due to insufficient tire inflation.
By checking all tires on a monthly basis, including spare tires, to accommodate the pressure recommended by the car manufacturer.
In addition, check if there are bumps or cracks in the tire side wall. 3.
Fluid leakage: undiscovered leaks in critical systems can be devastating, can cause an engine or transmission to explode, or even a brake failure.
How to prevent.
Use your owner\'s manual as a guide to check the level of the car on a regular basis.
Look for bugs on the sidewalk where you park.
Black drops are oil;
The coolant is green, orange or yellow;
Brown or red oil drops can be transmission or brake fluid.
Any one of them can cause trouble and will need to go to the mechanic to check your car. 4.
Wiper wear or fluid free: many accidents are caused by poor visibility.
Usually, drivers don\'t realize that the wiper is hit or their washing machine tank is empty until they need it most.
The tear of the wiper blade will cause the wiper arm to rub the glass and may damage the windshield.
How to prevent.
Car testers reported by consumers found that Wipers usually degrade in the first six months, so it is better to replace them twice a year.
Store spare wiper blades and a gallon of non-frozen cleaning fluid in the trunk. 5.
Fuse: when the fuse is blown, it can disable critical electrical systems such as headlights, defrost, or anti-lock braking systems, any of which can cause an accident. What to do.
You can\'t prevent electrical problems, but if a fuse is blown, you should check it first.
The consumer report recommends carrying spare fuses and fuses in the car to pull pul.
Fuse kits range from $5 to $20 and can be purchased at the auto parts store.
Be sure to check your owner\'s manual to make sure the fuse you purchased is the correct amp rating and size.
If the same fuse explodes repeatedly, ask the mechanic to check the system. 6.
Broken drive belt: it can fail the water pump or AC generator of the car, causing overheating of the engine and battery failure.
When it comes to maintenance, the belt is easy to forget.
How to prevent.
Consumer Reports recommend regular inspections.
If the belt has cracks or rubber wear or feels brittle, it should be replaced.
If the belt has a lot of slack, the underside is shiny, or you hear a squeaky sound while driving, it should be adjusted or repaired.
After about 100,000, most drive belts should be replaced. 7.
We all did it.
At best, this is a small annoyance;
To make matters worse, this is a serious problem when you are in an unsafe environment.
How to prevent.
Some automakers offer valet keys or plastic keys for emergency use.
If your spare key is not suitable for your wallet or wallet, consider a magnetic box for $5 to $10 and you can hide under the car or behind the license plate.
Usually, the dealer can cut the door key at a much cheaper price than the locksmith.
Remote information processing services such as GM\'s OnStar can remotely unlock the car.
Consumer Reports have access to the magazine\'s information and articles online. org(May 13, 2010)
When it comes to our car, most of us don\'t like surprises, especially the kind of car that keeps us stuck on the highway in bad weather.
In the magazine\'s annual car magazine, the editor of the consumer report gave advice on how to avoid unwelcome accidents such as blowout, battery dead Power, Fuse and drive belt break if they did, suggesting how to deal with them.
The full story, called the unwelcome surprise, is available online on the consumer report annual car release and consumer report, which went to market on March 2. org.
Daily Update of Consumer Reports. org is the go-
Get the latest car reviews, product news, breaking news blogs and car purchase information. 1.
Battery is dead: this is often the culprit when the engine cannot be flipped or started.
All batteries will weaken over time.
Certain activities can cause low battery power, such as not being used frequently, traveling for short distances, or using multiple accessories when the headlights are on.
Even if you forget to turn off the lights or listen to the radio when the engine is off, it will drain the power in the battery, making the battery too weak to start when you need it.
How to prevent.
While the effects of depleted batteries often appear in cold mornings, the heat that usually damages the most is summer heat.
Therefore, the battery may fail at any time.
As part of the annual inspection, be sure to test the battery and the AC generator. 2.
Puncture or puncture: puncture and puncture may be caused by road hazards, tire defects or lack of care, which will cause you to lose control of the vehicle.
If you have experienced both, the consumer report recommends firmly grasping the wheel and gently guiding the car on the road as soon as possible.
How to prevent.
Due to low tire pressure, many tire problems are caused by overheating due to insufficient tire inflation.
By checking all tires on a monthly basis, including spare tires, to accommodate the pressure recommended by the car manufacturer.
In addition, check if there are bumps or cracks in the tire side wall. 3.
Fluid leakage: undiscovered leaks in critical systems can be devastating, can cause an engine or transmission to explode, or even a brake failure.
How to prevent.
Use your owner\'s manual as a guide to check the level of the car on a regular basis.
Look for bugs on the sidewalk where you park.
Black drops are oil;
The coolant is green, orange or yellow;
Brown or red oil drops can be transmission or brake fluid.
Any one of them can cause trouble and will need to go to the mechanic to check your car. 4.
Wiper wear or fluid free: many accidents are caused by poor visibility.
Usually, drivers don\'t realize that the wiper is hit or their washing machine tank is empty until they need it most.
The tear of the wiper blade will cause the wiper arm to rub the glass and may damage the windshield.
How to prevent.
Car testers reported by consumers found that Wipers usually degrade in the first six months, so it is better to replace them twice a year.
Store spare wiper blades and a gallon of non-frozen cleaning fluid in the trunk. 5.
Fuse: when the fuse is blown, it can disable critical electrical systems such as headlights, defrost, or anti-lock braking systems, any of which can cause an accident. What to do.
You can\'t prevent electrical problems, but if a fuse is blown, you should check it first.
The consumer report recommends carrying spare fuses and fuses in the car to pull pul.
Fuse kits range from $5 to $20 and can be purchased at the auto parts store.
Be sure to check your owner\'s manual to make sure the fuse you purchased is the correct amp rating and size.
If the same fuse explodes repeatedly, ask the mechanic to check the system. 6.
Broken drive belt: it can fail the water pump or AC generator of the car, causing overheating of the engine and battery failure.
When it comes to maintenance, the belt is easy to forget.
How to prevent.
Consumer Reports recommend regular inspections.
If the belt has cracks or rubber wear or feels brittle, it should be replaced.
If the belt has a lot of slack, the underside is shiny, or you hear a squeaky sound while driving, it should be adjusted or repaired.
After about 100,000, most drive belts should be replaced. 7.
We all did it.
At best, this is a small annoyance;
To make matters worse, this is a serious problem when you are in an unsafe environment.
How to prevent.
Some automakers offer valet keys or plastic keys for emergency use.
If your spare key is not suitable for your wallet or wallet, consider a magnetic box for $5 to $10 and you can hide under the car or behind the license plate.
Usually, the dealer can cut the door key at a much cheaper price than the locksmith.
Remote information processing services such as GM\'s OnStar can remotely unlock the car.
Consumer Reports have access to the magazine\'s information and articles online. org(May 13, 2010)
When it comes to our car, most of us don\'t like surprises, especially the kind of car that keeps us stuck on the highway in bad weather.
In the magazine\'s annual car magazine, the editor of the consumer report gave advice on how to avoid unwelcome accidents such as blowout, battery dead Power, Fuse and drive belt break if they did, suggesting how to deal with them.
The full story, called the unwelcome surprise, is available online on the consumer report annual car release and consumer report, which went to market on March 2. org.
Daily Update of Consumer Reports. org is the go-
Get the latest car reviews, product news, breaking news blogs and car purchase information. 1.
Battery is dead: this is often the culprit when the engine cannot be flipped or started.
All batteries will weaken over time.
Certain activities can cause low battery power, such as not being used frequently, traveling for short distances, or using multiple accessories when the headlights are on.
Even if you forget to turn off the lights or listen to the radio when the engine is off, it will drain the power in the battery, making the battery too weak to start when you need it.
How to prevent.
While the effects of depleted batteries often appear in cold mornings, the heat that usually damages the most is summer heat.
Therefore, the battery may fail at any time.
As part of the annual inspection, be sure to test the battery and the AC generator. 2.
Puncture or puncture: puncture and puncture may be caused by road hazards, tire defects or lack of care, which will cause you to lose control of the vehicle.
If you have experienced both, the consumer report recommends firmly grasping the wheel and gently guiding the car on the road as soon as possible.
How to prevent.
Due to low tire pressure, many tire problems are caused by overheating due to insufficient tire inflation.
By checking all tires on a monthly basis, including spare tires, to accommodate the pressure recommended by the car manufacturer.
In addition, check if there are bumps or cracks in the tire side wall. 3.
Fluid leakage: undiscovered leaks in critical systems can be devastating, can cause an engine or transmission to explode, or even a brake failure.
How to prevent.
Use your owner\'s manual as a guide to check the level of the car on a regular basis.
Look for bugs on the sidewalk where you park.
Black drops are oil;
The coolant is green, orange or yellow;
Brown or red oil drops can be transmission or brake fluid.
Any one of them can cause trouble and will need to go to the mechanic to check your car. 4.
Wiper wear or fluid free: many accidents are caused by poor visibility.
Usually, drivers don\'t realize that the wiper is hit or their washing machine tank is empty until they need it most.
The tear of the wiper blade will cause the wiper arm to rub the glass and may damage the windshield.
How to prevent.
Car testers reported by consumers found that Wipers usually degrade in the first six months, so it is better to replace them twice a year.
Store spare wiper blades and a gallon of non-frozen cleaning fluid in the trunk. 5.
Fuse: when the fuse is blown, it can disable critical electrical systems such as headlights, defrost, or anti-lock braking systems, any of which can cause an accident. What to do.
You can\'t prevent electrical problems, but if a fuse is blown, you should check it first.
The consumer report recommends carrying spare fuses and fuses in the car to pull pul.
Fuse kits range from $5 to $20 and can be purchased at the auto parts store.
Be sure to check your owner\'s manual to make sure the fuse you purchased is the correct amp rating and size.
If the same fuse explodes repeatedly, ask the mechanic to check the system. 6.
Broken drive belt: it can fail the water pump or AC generator of the car, causing overheating of the engine and battery failure.
When it comes to maintenance, the belt is easy to forget.
How to prevent.
Consumer Reports recommend regular inspections.
If the belt has cracks or rubber wear or feels brittle, it should be replaced.
If the belt has a lot of slack, the underside is shiny, or you hear a squeaky sound while driving, it should be adjusted or repaired.
After about 100,000, most drive belts should be replaced. 7.
We all did it.
At best, this is a small annoyance;
To make matters worse, this is a serious problem when you are in an unsafe environment.
How to prevent.
Some automakers offer valet keys or plastic keys for emergency use.
If your spare key is not suitable for your wallet or wallet, consider a magnetic box for $5 to $10 and you can hide under the car or behind the license plate.
Usually, the dealer can cut the door key at a much cheaper price than the locksmith.
Remote information processing services such as GM\'s OnStar can remotely unlock the car.
Consumer Reports have access to the magazine\'s information and articles online.
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